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Proper high temp paint for my 428 engine

Discussion in '1965-1970 Shelby Mustang GT350 & GT500' started by Oregon Shelby, Mar 1, 2010.

  1. Oregon Shelby

    Oregon Shelby Well-Known Member

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    I am taking my engine out and am going to repaint the engine along with doing other minor adjustments. I have used Eastwoods Ford blue paint but have noticed that the paint has worn off over time due to the heat around the exhaust manifold. The block itself still looks nice and fresh even after 5 several years of regular use. Is there a paint that someone has used that is high temperature paint that has not burned off over the years? If so, where did you purchase the paint, the brand name and any other info that might be helpful.

    thanks again Shelbyforums!
     
  2. TLEA

    TLEA Well-Known Member

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    Brian, I use mixed paint and spray it. It will hold up much better than any rattle can. The formula is PPG 13358. Use it with 20% flattener and urethene hardener.
     
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  3. Oregon Shelby

    Oregon Shelby Well-Known Member

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    Great Tim. Thanks for the suggestion. I think I will try that instead of the can.
     
  4. 67200F5A02206

    67200F5A02206 Well-Known Member

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    I've used Krylon and Duplicolor. Both have held up well for 15 years. Don't know what happened to yours. Get the High Temp Ceramic (500 degree) stuff. You can find it at Auto Zone.
     
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  5. Bob Gaines

    Bob Gaines Well-Known Member

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    +1 . Don't waste your time with anything else. Bob
     
  6. cougar

    cougar Well-Known Member

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    Hey Bob---Opinions are fine BUT, why would you say don't waste your time with anything else? I have probably put more miles on some of my cars over the years than most and have had great luck with some rattle can engine paints.
    Frank
     
  7. TLEA

    TLEA Well-Known Member

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    opinions vary
     
  8. Bob Gaines

    Bob Gaines Well-Known Member

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    Frank, for you the rattle can paints may be fine but once you have done it the best way with professional two part paints it is hard to go back to the inferior rattle can products that don't stand up well to solvents,fade easily the first time you use a engine degreaser on them etc. If you have never used the professional products on your cars then it is hard to know what you are missing. I have used both and I am not alone. I just wanted to give readers the advantage of bypassing what I feel are mistakes I have made in that area. If the engine is out of the car I would not do it any other way then the PPG paint. Sure the rattle can engine paints are easier for a rattle can restoration and less expensive but you get what you pay for in durability when compared to the professional products like PPG. If you are taking shortcuts already like touching up the engine in the car then I can see the lure of the rattle can products when compared to professional products. If you don't expect a lot out of the rattle can products you will not be disappointed.
     
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  9. cougar

    cougar Well-Known Member

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    You know Bob, you can be very condescending by nature. I am not a dumb kid and I don't appreciate being treated like one. First, Ford did NOT use two stage paints on anything in the 60's and 70's so technically they are not correct. I have had a few original cars over the years with 30,000 plus miles that have had original paint on the engines that had held up quite well. Second, there is NO paint that will hold up against most solvents and any paint will burn where the exhaust manifold meets the head.
    I don't want to argue with you BUT don't try to make like just because you say so then that is the best and only way to do something.
    I do all of my own work and have owned a few National winners over the years.
     
  10. TLEA

    TLEA Well-Known Member

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    Actually Frank I thought Bob's comments were anything but condescending. It sounds to me like you just don't want anyone's opinion too matter but yours. Also the statement about what Ford used is also incorrect. Although probably not as good as today's version it was in fact an acrylic enamel with a hardener.
     
  11. cougar

    cougar Well-Known Member

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    I didn't say anything about my comment being the only correct one. I was just saying that a person can use the rattle cans with good results. I didn't use words like the BEST and professional. And you are wrong about the paint. Thinners and hardeners added to paints do not change them from being single stage.

    Part of what he said, and he has done it to me before.

    If you don't expect a lot out of the rattle can products you will not be disappointed.

    Condescending--Assuming a tone of superiority, or a patronizing attitude

    I don't want to argue with you either but if you feel like you have something smart a$$ to say to me please take it off the forum. My email address is

    boss9@windstream.net
     
  12. TLEA

    TLEA Well-Known Member

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    Well your response only solidifies my statement. You clearly have an agenda based on past expeiences based on your own admission. Such replies are immature and have no place on a public forum. Your reply of smart a$$ also supports the statement I made that only your opinion matters.
    Regarding your comment that Bob is wrong because he used the term 2 part paints, then yes he called enamel w/hardener that and it is technically not a two part as in epoxy or urethane catalyzed. He was in fact referring to exactly what we are talking about by his +1 replying to my original post of enamel w/hardner so I guess you could castrate him for wrong terminology. You are also incorrect that 2 part or 2 stage or catalyed paints weren't usedin Ford production in 68. The red oxide primer was in fact an epoxy cured paint.
     
  13. Coralsnake

    Coralsnake Well-Known Member

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    + 2

    Spend a little extra and paint it with a spray gun. The paint sprayed with hardner will give you the longest durability and best results. In this case, you get what you pay for. If you want to be second best, you can get one of those "upscale" Mustangs.


    :blink:
     

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