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Thread: 2007 shelby gt 500 as an investment???

  1. #19
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    Re: 2007 shelby gt 500 as an investment???

    I'll agree (make that 4 of us). I can't take 'em with me and the kids will just sell 'em. I say run the tires off (on the track, of course).

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    Re: 2007 shelby gt 500 as an investment???

    Yup. That's the ticket. Students have asked me if they'll see it in the teacher's parking lot; absolutely. I plan to drive it regularly, except during snow/salt season, until they take my license away. I don't think my son would sell it. He might get it in 30 or so years.

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    Re: 2007 shelby gt 500 as an investment???

    With sales of cars & trucks down as they are bigtime w ford & G.M. & ford sees orders coming in for the shelby like gangbustres, & they can make money on them, don't you think ford is going to produce as many as they can? If they have orders for 100,000 their going to make them period. At least if I was running ford thats what I'd would do in a minute.--S.

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    Re: 2007 shelby gt 500 as an investment???

    Ford will not up production based on speculation. It will be very expensive to up there production on these vehicles. It is more likley that they will raise the price, at least for the first year. You may see the production raise slightly for the second year. I would not be suprised to see the price raise from the high 30 mark to the mid 40 mark.

  5. #23
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    Re: 2007 shelby gt 500 as an investment???

    Interesting: Two opposing views both based on sound logic. This may be why SVT dealers are taking names on pre-order lists. These could be used as a guage for determining total production numbers. I do feel, however, they will only be able to produce a limited number per year due to the higher demand for 'regular' Mustangs. We'll see. As long as I get mine, all is well.

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    Very good points

    made by everyone.

    From what I have been able to learn, the Shelby GT 500 is a definite go for 2008. If any will be made in 2009 is anyone's guess. It would make sense for Ford to make them for at least 2-/3 years just to justify tooling up costs. The sales and popularity of the Shelby GT 500 alone is not going to make or break Ford Motor Company. FMC is not making the immense markup $$$ on these cars, you know who is. To much of a good thing often ends up being not so good. More importantly, I think it helps open the door and gauge interest for producing other possible retro performance Mustangs, such as Boss 302's etc., which could be made in larger numbers, and could be much more profitable. The thing to remember about buying cars for investment, is that it is always speculation, just like real estate. Another thing to consider is that it is impossible to predict the future economy, and other factors which affect vehicle prices. A friend who was a dealer in speciality cars for over 45 years, and has more than a dozen Corvettes in his collection (among others), from ZR-1's, going back to late 60's big block's, to a 1957 fuelie, once told me that 30 years seems to be the magic number for how long it takes for collector cars to start reaching their potential value. Look at the ZR-1 Corvettes. They sold for somewhere around $60K+ in the early 90's. The ZR-1 option alone was worth over $30K. You can buy them now for somewhere in the $30K range. They are really neat Corvettes. But most people do not understand or appreciate what they are. I am purchasing a 2007 Shelby GT 500 because I think it is one of the nicest car performance cars I have ever seen. I have never owned a Ford car. Had many Ford P/U trucks. Many GM muscle cars of the 60's, 70's, 80's, 90's, and 2000's. The more I leared about the 2007 Shelby GT 500, I absolutely had to have one. To purchase a 60's or 70's Shelby as an investment is a no brainer. But how much are you going to have to pay for it? You could probably buy 2 or 3 2007 Shelby's for the same amount of money. When I was on my quest to find a 2007 Shelby GT 500, I thought long and hard about taking the risk of waiting to see if a 2007 Shelby GT Mustang, what I have heard called the "poor man's Shelby", would be a viable alternative. However, I decided that with the likelyhood of a very limited amount, (1000 or so of them being made for 2007 and available beggining about 1/07, from what I read on the Ford site if I remember correctly), it would be very difficult to get one. Unless of course, Ford decides to produce them, and thus could make them in much greater numbers. However, I understand at this time, Shelby is going to make the Shelby GT also. The 500 Shelby GT350H Rent-A-Racer Commerative Edition cars Hertz is getting, and will eventually resell, would be an even longer shot for a person to acquire. I really think both these Shelby made cars are very much underappreciated for their potential collector value. After all, these cars are actually being modified by Shelby, and I think they have an enormous potential as an investment, due to the fact Shelby is making them himself, and the fact that they will likely be made in such limited numbers. Shelby can only modify so many of them in a given year. The Hertz cars come with an automatic only, with no-disable T/C, which may not appeal to some. From what I hear, the Shelby GT's, that are to be available to the general public, may be purchased with manual transmissions also. Of course you had also best like coupe's only, in black or white with silver stripes. It might be that this "poor man's Shelby" could eventually become an investment "sleeper" with great potential.

    Only time will tell as to the monetary appreciation, and collectability of the Shelby GT 500. Historically, the big C/I high H/P Shelby GT 500 and Shelby GT 500 KR have been the Shelby Mustang value "King's of the Road". The 2007 Shelby GT 500 is the highest H/P factory made Mustang in the car's history, and IMHO, that cannot be a bad attribute. The eventual numbers of Shelby GT 500 Mustang's made will no doubt have an efffect on their future value as a whole. If you are so inclined, a Shelby GT 500 convertible might not be a bad idea, for investment purposes, as convertibles appear to be worth more down the road, as is the case for most brands of older muscle cars. The 2007 Shelby GT 500 is such an attractive car, with desireable features, there is no doubt in my mind it will withstand the test of time, and will eventually become very valuable. In any event, I will throughly enjoy and appreciate mine.

    I am far from an expert on Mustang's or Shelby's. I merely offer some of my thoughts gained through many years of muscle car experience.

    Doc
    Last edited by mrdoc442; October 21st, 2006 at 11:34 PM.
    Happy Trails

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    Re: Very good points

    Quote Originally Posted by mrdoc442
    Historically, the big C/I high H/P Shelby GT 500 and Shelby GT 500 KR have been the Shelby Mustang value "King's of the Road".
    Doc,
    I disagree a bit. I think racing history and low build numbers are more important than cubic inches (although CI and convertibles are certainly important).

    I don't think you'll find a more valuable Shelby Mustang than the 1965 GT350R. They made around 34 of the cars (although there must be 50 out there now ). The low digit 1965 GT350 cars are also very valuable.

    The 65/66 cars dominated their class in racing (SCCA-BP). They were built at the Shelby facilities in CA. I am sure you are aware that Ford took over production in 1968 and moved the assembly to the A. O. Smith facility in Illinois.

    I do agree that it seems to take about 30 years for a car to become a valuable collector car (if it does become desirable). I think that number is somewhat due to the disposable income of the person what has always wanted the particular car; they've shed their kids and mortgage and have extra money for chase their dream car(s).

    Look at the ZR-1 Corvettes. They sold for somewhere around $60K+ in the early 90's. The ZR-1 option alone was worth over $30K. You can buy them now for somewhere in the $30K range. They are really neat Corvettes. But most people do not understand or appreciate what they are.
    Some people feel they are overpriced and not very attractive cars.

    The original buyers were killed. They paid $60K (+ a premium in most cases). The original cars are now 16 years old and worth about one-half of the original cost. You could have bought any piece of land or thrown a dart at a board to pick a mutual fund that would have tripled (or more) your money by now.

    GM compounded the poor "investment" on the car by continuing to produce the car (~7000 cars in 6 model years, 1990-1995).

    The Viper was the next car to disappoint the "new car" collectors. I remember when dealers were offering them for double the MSRP (~1992). The price slowly eroded until they quickly were selling for MSRP (new) and later the low-mile ones could be bought for half of MSRP (or a fourth of what some paid). Should I mention the Ford GT, the Carrera GT, or the Z06?

    I'd like to own the new GT500, but I'd never consider it as an investment. I'd consider it a car to constantly test its performance potential (i.g., take it to a race track and test the rev limiter).

    Doc J.
    1995 Mustang Cobra R
    1965 Mustang vintage FIA road race car
    1995 IMSA Cobra
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    Sound comments

    Quote Originally Posted by 95CobraR
    Doc,
    I disagree a bit. I think racing history and low build numbers are more important than cubic inches (although CI and convertibles are certainly important).

    I don't think you'll find a more valuable Shelby Mustang than the 1965 GT350R. They made around 34 of the cars (although there must be 50 out there now ). The low digit 1965 GT350 cars are also very valuable.

    The 65/66 cars dominated their class in racing (SCCA-BP). They were built at the Shelby facilities in CA. I am sure you are aware that Ford took over production in 1968 and moved the assembly to the A. O. Smith facility in Illinois.

    I do agree that it seems to take about 30 years for a car to become a valuable collector car (if it does become desirable). I think that number is somewhat due to the disposable income of the person what has always wanted the particular car; they've shed their kids and mortgage and have extra money for chase their dream car(s).


    Some people feel they are overpriced and not very attractive cars.

    The original buyers were killed. They paid $60K (+ a premium in most cases). The original cars are now 16 years old and worth about one-half of the original cost. You could have bought any piece of land or thrown a dart at a board to pick a mutual fund that would have tripled (or more) your money by now.

    GM compounded the poor "investment" on the car by continuing to produce the car (~7000 cars in 6 model years, 1990-1995).

    The Viper was the next car to disappoint the "new car" collectors. I remember when dealers were offering them for double the MSRP (~1992). The price slowly eroded until they quickly were selling for MSRP (new) and later the low-mile ones could be bought for half of MSRP (or a fourth of what some paid). Should I mention the Ford GT, the Carrera GT, or the Z06?

    I'd like to own the new GT500, but I'd never consider it as an investment. I'd consider it a car to constantly test its performance potential (i.g., take it to a race track and test the rev limiter).

    Doc J.
    Hi Doc J,

    Looking at your list of cars, you no doubt have first hand knowledge of many of the points I put forth in my narrative.

    You are absolutely correct in your observation that track history and numbers built are paramount, as are condition and documentation.

    As to the value, with regard to C/I and H/P, I was reviewing a Shelby Muscle Car Price Guide featured in the April 2006 issue of Hemmings Muscle Machines magazine. I realize that such a feature is not the tell all, end all, final analysis of the value of all Shelby Mustangs, (particularly rare cars), but only a guide. The common denominator of the highest valued cars on the list in addition to whether or not a convertible, seemed to correlate to the 1968 through 1970 GT 500 big cubic inch, high h/p engines. As a matter of fact, the higher H/P cars, with a few exceptions, were valued well above other GT 500 cars in the later years with same C/I, but lower H/P, and overall above all the other cars with lower C/I, lower H/P. Again there were a few exceptions. I agree that is but one or two of the factors which contribute to the value of these cars. However, it might follow that the higher H/P, bigger C/I cars did ok on the track, or maybe just attracted potential buyers in a different way, (were more desireable, thus more sought after), but I have not historical perspective that that is fact, but to me seems logical.

    The point, or comparison rather, I was hoping to make is that the 2007 Shelby GT 500 also had the larger C/I engine, and highest H/P of any factory Mustand ever built. I didn't mean to imply that those two characteristics alone would make the 2007 Shelby GT 500 a high value collector, but IMHO that uniqueness wouldn't hurt the value either.

    Your observation in paragraph four with regard to (war baby-for the greatest part) disposable income is a bullseye. As I stated in my introduction somewhere in this Forum, I have waited for some 40 years, since I was slogging around in the jungles in Viet Nam to get my hands on a Shelby. I am excited beyond belief. As I see you also are no stranger to GM automobiles as you are one privileged to possess a Z06. I don't feel quite so all alone on a Shelby Forum.

    I tried to scan and attach the feature in Hemmings I referenced (unsuccessfully, sorry), I got it scanned but could not get it to attach. I'm going to quit before I lose all I have written here and have to redo from memory. I'm sure it would have generated much discussion/dissention, etc., but I think they were offering a, rule of thumb, middle of the road guide, not including the astronomically valued Shelby's, such as Shelbys with a racing history, earliest number, primo condition, well documented and so forth.

    I hope Ford does not make the mistake of over producing the 2007-on Shelby GT 500, or a lot of us that overpaid for the 2007-on Shelby GT 500's may find ourselves in a similar boat to the ZR-1 and Viper victims.

    As said previously, it's all speculation as to future value when it comes to cars and real estate. For the most part, automobiles are one of the worst investments a person can make in this life. Unless carefully selected, most new cars begin to depreciate the moment you drive them off the lot, and continue to go further downhill over time. Many people have financed new cars only to discover that at some point that they owe more on the car than it is worth. There are very few cars that are immediately worth $15K + over MSRP NADA value as soon as you buy them. The 2007 Shelby GT 500 is one. Hence the gouging, scalping, over-pricing, EBay brokers, et. al., that the majority of potential 2007 Shelby GT 500 buyers including me, have had to wade through, and put up with. Brokers on EBay that do not even touch the 2007 Shelby GT00's they buy, just immediately turn them for a large profit. Dealerships are selling them on EBay as well, which as I understand it is against FMC policy. Smaller Dealerships are selling their allotments to other, bigger dealerships for a huge profit. Dealers on EBay are selling a promise of being able to order the 2007 Shelby GT 500 of your choice, without even having a car on the ground. Some are auctioning off a price above MSRP for the right to order a 2007 Shelby GT 500. Out of all the dealerships I contacted, about 150 in number, I found maybe 3 or 4 that had the integrity to stick to the MSRP when they sell/sold their 2007 Shelby GT 500 cars.

    As I said in my post, I just plan to enjoy mine. If good future value comes to it, so be it. If not, I will have a blast with it anyway. I know a good car when I see it, and the 2007 Shelby is a great car.

    I still maintain that the 500 new "Rent-A-Racers" might be real value sleepers down the road. Unless I am mistaken, didn't a completely restored first edition w/Koni shocks and 10 spoke wheels sell a while back in January on Barrett Jackson for nearly $181K? There were 1000 of the original GT350H cars built, versus the 500 new GT-H's which as far as I know are being or are already built. I can't wait to see what the mark up will be on those when they are sold as used. Probably will set records as the highest valued used cars ever sold. Oops, make that highest valued "pre-owned". Got to be politically correct :+)

    Thanks for your comments.

    Doc
    Last edited by mrdoc442; October 22nd, 2006 at 05:43 PM.
    Happy Trails

  9. #27

    Re: 2007 shelby gt 500 as an investment???

    find it - buy it - drive it -race it - wreck it - fix it - sell it

    but most of all

    ENJOY IT!!!!



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    Re: 2007 shelby gt 500 as an investment???

    Quote Originally Posted by stephen_becker
    find it - buy it - drive it -race it - wreck it - fix it - sell it

    but most of all

    ENJOY IT!!!!


    That was good SB, LMAO,

    But can we skip wreck it, fix it, sell it? But most definitely, I will enjoy it!!

    I do not plan on ever selling my 2007 Shelby GT 500 :+) Some cars I tend to hang on to for a long time, and the 2007 Shelby GT 500 is destined to be one.

    Thanks for the thumbs up!

    Doc
    Happy Trails

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    Re: Sound comments

    Quote Originally Posted by mrdoc442
    I realize that such a feature is not the tell all, end all, final analysis of the value of all Shelby Mustangs, (particularly rare cars), but only a guide.
    I am familiar with the Shelby guide that was published in Hemmings. I have it along with two other guides (Sports Car Market being my favorite). I also study the auction results (easy to do online). I am not really a collector as I just watch the market out of curiosity. As you mentioned the guides do not include special cars (a car with a story).

    I mentioned the 1965 GT350 R because one (SFM5R102) sold for $990,000 at the RM Amelia Island Auction on March 11, 2006. It was Bob Johnson's 1965 SCCA B/P (B Production) championship car. The provenance of the car is very important to its value.

    Another example is the 1963 Cobra 289 Le Mans #CSX2136. The Le Mans feature included Webers, Halibrand wheels, fronts spats, rear flares, Konis, brake cooling ducts, coolers, and a fuel pressure gauge that replaced the clock. The car competed in races in 1963 and was acquired by Ed Leslie in 1964. He dominated SCCA A/P (A Production) winning his class in 7 of 11 races including the ARRC final at Riverside. This car sold for $1,650.000 at the same RM auction at Amelia.

    However, it might follow that the higher H/P, bigger C/I cars did ok on the track, or maybe just attracted potential buyers in a different way, (were more desireable, thus more sought after), but I have not historical perspective that that is fact, but to me seems logical.
    The 427 Cobra had many successes on the track, but the big block Shelby Mustangs had no racing success that I am aware of (too heavy, and the rules placed them in unpopular classes).

    I'd agree that the big block Shelby convertible is certainly desirable. You can drive them and enjoy the car for its original purpose. I doubt you'll see the above noted GT350R cruising to a local car show.

    I find it similar to the 1963 Sting Ray vs. the 1963 Sting Ray split-window with the Z06 option (the only real Z06 ). If you add knock-offs to a Z06 Sting Ray with a documented race history, you can ignore the price guides for a correct value.

    I still maintain that the 500 new "Rent-A-Racers" might be real value sleepers down the road.
    You may be correct. I understand that Hertz will sell them (at auction) to Ford dealers. The dealers will sell them on their lots. I agree that one sold for auction at a high price, and I don't doubt that the used rental cars will sell for high prices. I think the important value remains to be seen: The value in five, ten, and twenty years. Personally, I wouldn't want a high mileage car that has been driven by 100+ people.

    IMO, the recent Mustangs with the higher probability of possible higher valuations are the Cobra R's of 1993, 1995, 2000 (yea, I am biased). They made 107, 250, and 300 of the cars. They pass the rare test, and they have racing history. Mine is still not considered an investment as I'm sure it will end up in a wall one day.

    Please enjoy your car. I'll post up a picture for your inspiration. Try to keep your wheels and tires reasonably close to the payment.

    1995 Mustang Cobra R
    1965 Mustang vintage FIA road race car
    1995 IMSA Cobra
    2011 Mustang GT 5.0L
    1973 Porsche 2.7L

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    Re: 2007 shelby gt 500 as an investment???

    I don't think there is a new car out there that has gone up in value other than the initial"Gotta have the first one" rush like on the Ford GT. They all drop in value and so will the GT500. Buy one and use the investment angle with your wife as your reason for buying it. Then you have years to think up a excuse to tell her why it dropped or maybe she will forget. Buying a new car as a investment is a bad idea. Buying a new car for the enjoyment is a good idea.

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    Smile Re: 2007 shelby gt 500 as an investment???

    Quote Originally Posted by Charley
    I don't think there is a new car out there that has gone up in value other than the initial"Gotta have the first one" rush like on the Ford GT. They all drop in value and so will the GT500. Buy one and use the investment angle with your wife as your reason for buying it. Then you have years to think up a excuse to tell her why it dropped or maybe she will forget. Buying a new car as a investment is a bad idea. Buying a new car for the enjoyment is a good idea.
    True words spoken by a True Collector. after waiting six months and still no VIN# I got my deposit back @ $7500 over MSRP and sold the deal to another guy for a mere $1000 (He gets a new Shelby his way for $8500) and have decided to wait and pick up a hardly used well maintained 2007 Shelby in 2007-08 for a considerable discount as there will eventually be somebody in the large crowd of 9000 owners who has to regrettably sell their precious car due to circumstances beyond their control. happens every day and twice on Sunday!!

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    Thank you for

    [/QUOTE]

    the picture of the 2007 Torch Red Shelby GT 500 doing what it is supposed to do, front wheels reaching for air. I already printed it and will add it to my 2007 Shelby GT500 3 ring binder of everything I can find on the 2007 Shelby GT 500. I already filled one, and am well on the way to filling the second one, and I don't even have the car yet. Nothing like getting a leg up.

    I really enjoy your narratives. They are jam packed with information and facts that can only come from many years of first hand knowledge. Thanks so much. I agree with you that cars with a documented lineage, history, tend to bring big bucks. I guess people think that makes them a part of that history by just owning them. The LS-6 Chevelle race car that sold on B/J for mega bucks is another prime example. $1,100,000.00 if I remember correctly.
    Some race cars with a winning history seem to command major $$. Many don't though. Like Gallina's 1987 Buick Grand National. It was listed in the National Dragster for $99K. No takers. It went for $47K on B/J. What a steal. That car set a record in it's class that will never, ever be broken. Gallina, a retired stock broker, went to K. Duttweiler, a Buick GN guru, and said he didn't car how much it cost, he wanted to be the first Super Stocker in the 7's. Thats in the 1/4 mile. He eventually ran 7.81 @178.94 MPH. He was over 2 seconds quicker than record holding S/S cars two to three classes above his. That record will never ever be broken. The heads on that turbo were from the couple of Indy cars that Buick built motors for back in the 1980's. Priceless. I don't know how or where he got ahold of them, but they are extremely rare, and few and far between. Yet they practically had to give that car away. Go figure. I'm sure he was into that car way north of 1/4 Million $$. Gave it away for $47K. Of course that car was so impractical. Twin turbo with one off custom made parts. Absolutely not streetable. But it seems like some museum would have snatched it up.

    It's worth mentioning that the rights to the first 2007 Shelby GT 500 which sold on Barret Jackson for somewhere around $638K if I remember right. That is a pretty good start, no? That much money for a car that isn't even built yet. At least it was for a good cause. I think that is one a big factor that got the 2007 Shelby GT 500 off to such a magnificent start. Didn' t bode to well for those of us destined to purchase the 2007 Shelby GT 500 though. Read $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$.

    Doc
    Happy Trails

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    Re: 2007 shelby gt 500 as an investment???

    Going back to the investment part of this. Unless you get a 2007 that is some limited color, or in some way unique or limited production, I think there going to be just too many around. Although there is one less since I did see one that was totaled already.

    I say just drive it and have fun.

    I did buy my Supersnake based on a production run of 7 cars from Unique Performance. It's probably not worth what I paid for it today but I do think long term someone is going to want a Shelby with 725hp that is in the registry. We will see what happens in 20 years from now.
    Last edited by DeLa1Rob; October 24th, 2006 at 03:06 AM.
    1967 GT500 #2532, 1 of 10 (White, Auto, Factory A/C)
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    Re: 2007 shelby gt 500 as an investment???

    Quote Originally Posted by mherman2
    I say just drive it and have fun.
    I say drive it hard until the wheels fall off.

    Here is Bruce's car at Road America (with racing tires on new wheels). Notice he took out the fog lights to install brake cooling ducts.





    Doc, These pics should be very inspirational!
    1995 Mustang Cobra R
    1965 Mustang vintage FIA road race car
    1995 IMSA Cobra
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    1973 Porsche 2.7L

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    Doc J,

    Quote Originally Posted by 95CobraR
    I say drive it hard until the wheels fall off.

    Here is Bruce's car at Road America (with racing tires on new wheels). Notice he took out the fog lights to install brake cooling ducts.





    Doc, These pics should be very inspirational!
    Now is that a bad assed looking GT500 or what? It just exudes racing heritage, and speed.

    Thanks for the look-see.

    Doc
    Happy Trails

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